Key Points In ADA Title III cases, the plaintiff has the initial burden to show removing a barrier is readily achievable. The Court has yet to consider the complexities of naval architecture and the unique safety and seaworthiness issues on ships. If barrier removal is not readily achievable, alternative methods to barrier removal or other facilitation for access to the service should be considered. In Lopez v. Catalina Channel Express, Inc. (9th Cir., Sept. 9, 2020, 19-55136) ___ F.3d ___ ("Lopez"), the Ninth Circuit held that a plaintiff alleging denial of public accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)…

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Whether its as small as convincing a six-year-old to go to bed at 8pm (and stay in bed), or as big as nailing down the terms of a professional contract, were negotiating constantly. But are we negotiating optimally After all,... Read More The post How to Improve Negotiations, Part 1: Planning & Strategy appeared first on Litigation Insights.

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Contributed by Suzannah Wilson Overholt, October 15, 2020 With the General Election on November 3rd rapidly approaching, registered voters are exploring various options for casting their ballots, be it through mail or in person early or on Election Day (November 3rd). One critical factor that may drive an individual’s voting plan is their work schedule, […]

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Congratulations, Keely Duke! Keely was recently selected to appear in the 3rd edition of Benchmark Litigation, Labor & Employment annual guide as a Benchmark Litigation Labor & Employment Star. This honor means Keely was identified in Benchmarks research as one of the preeminent Labor & Employment litigation practitioners in the United States. Way to go […]

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Contributed by Carlos Arvalo and guest author Molly Arranz, October 9, 2020 Even in the pandemic, the (high) number of class action filings based upon the Illinois Biometric Privacy Act (BIPA) remains steady. And, against that backdrop come two recent decisions that may impact how employers need to shift their defense strategies. First, in McDonald […]

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Key Points Effective Jan. 1, 2021, most California employees even those who work for very small businesses will be entitled to 12 weeks of job-protected time off work under the CFRA for qualifying reasons. Qualifying reasons for leave are broadly defined to include caring for a family member including grandparents, grandchildren, adult children and siblings with a serious health condition. California employers covered by both the CFRA and the FMLA may need to provide up to 24 weeks of job-protected leave in certain circumstances. Governor Newsom signed Senate Bill (SB) 1383, significantly expanding the California Family…

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Contributed by Carlos Arvalo and Michael Faley, October 5, 2020 While many California employers are challenged on multiple fronts at the moment from the ongoing pandemic and wildfires, they nonetheless need to be mindful of new employment law measures recently signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom. The major changes include stronger family leave protections, new COVID-19-related […]

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Key Points Starting Jan. 1, 2021, California skilled nursing facilities must have a full-time, dedicated Infection Preventionist. Infection Preventionists must be an RN or LVN, but their hours may not count in minimum direct patient care staffing calculations. During declared communicable disease emergencies, skilled nursing facilities must report data as required by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), which must include communicable disease-related death and suspected disease-related death information within 24 hours of the death. During such emergencies, skilled nursing facilities must also notify residents and their representatives and family members about cases of the communicable disease as instructed…

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On October 1, 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized a rule that will now allow facilities classified as “major source” polluters under the Clean Air Act the flexibility to reclassify their status as less prolific polluters. The EPA believes the new rule will ...

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Great news! Josh Evett just won a motion for partial summary judgment on behalf of a governmental entity in Idaho state court, successfully arguing that the court should dismiss plaintiffs 42 USC 1983 federal civil rights claims. This is an important victory as it significantly weakens plaintiffs damages case, simplifies the case for trial, […]

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You may be seeing a new name and face around Duke Evett. It is with great pleasure that we introduce to you our newest attorney, Taylor Bruun. Welcome, Taylor!

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In jury selections that involve workplace respirator use (either directly or indirectly) in the presence of toxic dusts, a key voir dire question has always been whether a juror personally has used a disposable respirator and, more importantly, whether they... Read More The post Fear, Trust, or Loathing Juror Attitudes Toward Respirators in the Time of COVID-19 appeared first on Litigation Insights.

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Weve written a fair amount about the importance of getting jurors to reveal bias in voir dire and subsequently admit they cant be fair, with the goal of maximizing cause challenges and removing your riskiest jurors from the panel. But... Read More The post How Do You Save or Rehabilitate Jurors in Voir Dire appeared first on Litigation Insights.

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On September 14, 2020, Governor Phil Murphy signed into law (((S-2380))), making it easier for “essential employees” who contract COVID-19 while working away from home to pursue workers’ compensation benefits claims. The new law is retroactive to March 9, 2020, when Governor Murphy ...

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Employers will undoubtedly see an uptick in wage and hour claims particularly since Employees have been deployed to working from home. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FSLA), and its state equivalents, Employers are required to pay non-salaried workers a minimum wage for every hour they work, and extra when they work 40 hours or more.As Employees move to telework because of the coronavirus pandemic, an Employer's ability to monitor and account for work hours becomes more difficult. It is not hard to imagine that Employees would claim they spent more than 8 hours a day or 40 hours a…

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On April 23, 2020, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") issued guidance to employers on COVID-19 virus testing of employees before entering the workplace. Specifically, the EEOC noted that the Americans with Disability Act requires any mandatory medical tests of employees be "job related and consistent with business necessity" and that "an individual with the virus will pose a direct threat to the health of others. Therefore, an employer may choose to administer COVID-19 testing to employees before they enter the workplace to determine if they have the virus."Of course, there are issues for employers to keep in mind:Tests must…

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Businesses are looking for guidance as they plan to re-open their business or are still open but concerned about claims being made against them from customers or employees that could potentially come in contact with the virus while at the place of business. Federal, state and local guidelines are being drafted to deal with business re-opening issues. However, understanding the meaning of these guidelines and their effect on other guidelines has left open questions about compliance, enforcement, guideline conflict and reporting. Murchison & Cumming has created a legal task force of attorneys to respond to their business client's needs to…

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In our first posting of 2020, we covered the FAA’s Remote Identification of Unmanned Aircraft Systems notice of proposed rulemaking and promised that we would be blogging on the impacts of the proposed new rule.This is the fourth in a series of postings about the significance of the proposed new rule. As of February 1, […]

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In our first posting of 2020, we covered the FAA’s Remote Identification of Unmanned Aircraft Systems notice of proposed rulemaking and promised that we would be blogging on the impacts of the proposed new rule. This is the third of a series of postings as to the significance of the proposed new rule. Imagine you […]

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In our first posting of 2020, we covered the FAA’s Remote Identification of Unmanned Aircraft Systems notice of proposed rulemaking and promised that we would be blogging on the impacts of the proposed new rule. This is the second of a series of postings as to the significance of the proposed new rule. There are […]

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Patricia Lewis was a teacher for the Albuquerque Public Schools. She contracted allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) from mold in her classroom in 2011. In 2012, she was also diagnosed with breast cancer and began chemotherapy with an oncologist. She died … Continue reading →

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GandyDancer, LLC and Rock House CGM, LLC are business competitors that provide services to railroad companies. GandyDancer believed that Rock House CGM was not properly licensed in New Mexico, and had misrepresented the nature of its services, which enabled it … Continue reading →

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The firm was recently recognized in the 2020 edition of Benchmark Litigation as one of only four highly recommended firms for litigation in Arkansas.  Steven W. Quattlebaum, John E. Tull III, E. B. (Chip) Chiles IV, Michael N. Shannon and Chad W. Pekron were highlighted as Litigation Stars and Brandon B. Cate, Joseph R. Falasco, R. Ryan Younger, and Vincent O. Chadick were named Future Stars.... Read More The post Benchmark Litigation 2020 Recognizes QGT & Attorneys appeared first on Quattlebaum, Grooms and Tull.

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Dan McKay has this story in the Albuquerque Journal about yesterday’s oral argument in Siebert v. Okun. The question presented is whether the damages cap in the New Mexico Medical Malpractice Act violates Article II, Section 12 of the New … Continue reading →

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Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC is pleased to announce that over half of our attorneys were recently named to the Mid-South Super Lawyers and Mid-South Rising Stars lists for 2019 bySuper Lawyers. E. B. (Chip) Chiles IV,Joseph R. Falasco,Timothy W. Grooms, Michael B. Heister, Jeb H. Joyce, J. Cliff McKinney II, Chad W. Pekron,Joseph W.... Read More The post 17 QGT Attorneys Recognized by Super Lawyers appeared first on Quattlebaum, Grooms and Tull.

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U.S. News & World Report and Best Lawyers have announced the “Best Law Firms” rankings for 2020 and Quattlebaum, Grooms & Tull PLLC is proud to be ranked regionally in twenty-two (22) practice areas.  Firms included in the 2020 “Best Law Firms” list are recognized for professional excellence with persistently impressive ratings from clients and... Read More The post QGT Ranked in 2020 “Best Law Firms” appeared first on Quattlebaum, Grooms and Tull.

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Traub Lieberman Straus & Shrewsberry LLP Senior Counsel Adam D. Krauss has just published a new white paper in conjunction with Aspen Re on climate change and its impact on the (re)insurance market. In the piece, titled Climate Change and the … Continue reading →

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By Kyle Dickinson The Northern District of Illinois held earlier this week that disgraced former Illinois state representative Keith Farnahans homeowners insurer is not required to cover Farnahans civil liability for child pornography.  The court reasoned that the injury suffered … Continue reading →

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On Friday, May 24, 2019, the Illinois Appellate Court, First District, affirmed a summary judgment ruling in favor of an insurance carrier that a police officer injured during a traffic stop was not using his police cruiser for liability coverage … Continue reading →

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Kent Bevanpublished a story in USLAW Magazine entitled, “When the Driver is a Computer: Addressing Auto Insurance Issues Surrounding Autonomous Vehicles.” “Driverless cars and autonomous vehiclesare a common sight in futuristic sciencefiction movies, but now theyre becoming apart of present-day … Continue reading →

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Lee Brumitt delivers a presentation to the American Society of Professional Estimators, “Dealing with Change and Delay on Construction Projects.”

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Lee Brumittpresented to the Kansas City Chapter of the National Association for Women in Construction on January 14. The presentation entitled Preserving and Advancing Contractors Payment Rights focused on federal, Missouri, and Kansas law and discussed tools and best practices … Continue reading →

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By James Eastham In its decision in Youell v. Cincinnati Ins. Co. 2018 WL 6816772 (Ind. Ct. App. Dec. 28, 2018), the Indiana Court of Appeals  ruled on the issue of whether a Landlords insurer has the right via subrogation … Continue reading →

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Traub Lieberman is pleased to announce the addition of three insurance coverage attorneys to the firms Chicago office. The additions include Dana A. Rice, Adam P. Joffe, and Abigail M. Afridi. All three attorneys join the firm from Hinshaw & Culbertson … Continue reading →

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If youre litigating a putative class action in federal court and get a class certification order that is adverse to your client (whether plaintiff or defense), you may petition to take an immediate appeal of that order. Fed. R. Civ. P. 23(f). The petition to appeal must be filed quicklywithin 14 days.Id.The short turnaround time … Continue reading Federal Class Action Appeals Whats the Deadline to Petition to Appeal When a Motion for Reconsideration Is Filed → The post Federal Class Action Appeals Whats the Deadline to Petition to Appeal When a Motion for Reconsideration Is Filed appeared…

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In response to an ever-increasing number of class action lawsuits claiming consumer deception based on the amount of empty space in product packaging, California recently amended its slack fill statutes to provide manufacturers with additional exemptions to avoid liability. For those who are unfamiliar, slack fill is defined as non-functional empty space in opaque product … Continue reading California Provides Defendants Additional Exemptions from Slack Fill Liability → The post California Provides Defendants Additional Exemptions from Slack Fill Liability appeared first on Hanson Bridgett Briefly.

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By: Jeremy S. Macklin In Reynolds Ventures, Inc. v. Scottsdale Ins. Co., 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 150508 (M.D. Fla., Sept. 5, 2018), the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida held that a surplus lines insurer who acts … Continue reading →

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“The California Supreme Court Modifies Its Opinion in Alvarado v. Dart Container Corporation, 4 Cal.5th 542 (2018) only to leave open the ‘workweek v. pay period’ regular rate calculation question.” Things couldn’t get much worse for employers in the area of calculating the regular rate of pay a complicated operation even on a good … Continue reading Revisiting Alvarado: “Work Week v. Pay Period” Question Remains → The post Revisiting Alvarado: “Work Week v. Pay Period” Question Remains appeared first on Hanson Bridgett Briefly.

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On March 17, 2017, the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) submitted Budget Trailer Bill 502. Budget Trailer Bill 502 would provide changes to the existing contractor registration requirements, as well as changes to the requirement for agencies to provide the DIR with notice of pending public works projects, as initially required by SB 854. SB… Continue Reading The post Budget Trailer Bill 502 would expand DIR fines and agency notice requirements appeared first on Infrastructure Law Blog.

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A new bill, AB 851, was introduced in the California legislature on February 16 that would expand the scope of the design-build authority currently available to local agencies. If adopted, AB 851 would amend Public Contract Code sections 22161 to expand the definition of special districts that can utilize the design-build authority under Public Contract… Continue Reading The post New bill would expand design-build authority for local agencies appeared first on Infrastructure Law Blog.

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This article by Griff Palmer in the NY Times Business Day section examines three P3 projects in the US, and compares the promises with some of the disappointments. The article provides a good overview of the significant issues that must be considered in order for a P3 to be successful for all concerned. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/24/business/dealbook/private-equity-water.htmlemc=edit_ta_20161224&nlid=51116999&ref=cta&_r=0  … Continue Reading The post Are P3s the answer to our infrastructure needs NYT article raises concerns. appeared first on Infrastructure Law Blog.

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Consumers Insurance Company provided underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage to Bradford Charles. Charles was subsequently injured in a motor vehicle accident with Christina Ranum. Charles attorney subsequently made a UIM claim on the Consumers UIM policy. Initially, Consumers denied UIM coverage, but subsequently determined that there may be UIM coverage under its policy. After Consumers initial [...]

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On January 21, 2015, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced through the Federal Register a study that examined (1) whether Police Accident Reports provide sufficient, consistent, and reliable information to support crash weighting determinations, (2) whether a crash weighting determination process would offer an even stronger predictor of carrier crash risk than the [...]

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On December 30, 2014, Gov. Quinn signed SB 1342 into law as P.A. 98-1142 (720 ILCS 5/14-1 et seq.); the measure puts new eavesdropping restrictions into place after the Illinois Supreme Court threw out the previous eavesdropping law last March. As a result of the March court ruling, all Illinois residents had absolutely no expectation [...]

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Cohen v. Maricopa County (Ct. Appeals, Div. One, August 16, 2011)   A man was involuntarily held in a hospital because he was a danger to self due to depression and repeated drug overdose. After inpatient treatment was completed, he was discharged from the hospital to begin court-ordered outpatient treatment with ValueOptions, the company that contracts with the State. While undergoing outpatient treatment, the man was found passed out with the drug Soma in his pocket. The man was medically cleared at the scene, but taken to an urgent care facility run by Meta Services pursuant to a subcontract with…

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Mark D. Zukowski was recently accepted into the National Academy of Distinguished Neutrals (NADN).  NADN is a national association whose membership consists of mediators and arbitrators distinguished by their hands-on experience in the field of civil and commercial conflict resolution.  Mark is one of only 21 attorneys and former judges who have been recognized as Charter Members of the Arizona Chapter.  Parties can visit the Chapter website at www.NADN.org/arizona to schedule, at no administrative cost, mediations with Mark by having direct access to his availability calendar.

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Jones, Skelton & Hochuli, PLC is pleased to announce Phillip Stanfields selection to the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). Stanfield is the ninth lawyer from JSH to receive this distinction.Mr. Stanfield joined Jones, Skelton & Hochuli in 1987, and has been a Partner since 2003. His practice is almost exclusively devoted to the defense of transportation clients.The general purposes of the American Board of Trial Advocates is to foster improvement in the ethical and technical standards of practice in the field of advocacy to the end that individual litigants may receive more effective representation and the general public be…

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The Association of Defense Trial Attorneys (ADTA) has recently selected Don Myles for membership to their organization.Don Myles has been a Partner with Jones, Skelton & Hochuli since 1987, and concentrates his practice on insurance coverage, bad faith and professional liability. He is admitted to practice in all state and federal courts in Arizona as well as the Ninth and Tenth Circuit Courts of Appeal, and the United States Supreme Court.Myles is the past President of the Arizona Association of Defense Counsel (AADC) and the USLAW Network. He is currently Senior Vice President for the Federation of Defense and Corporate…

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Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland v. Bondwriter Southwest (Ct. Appeals, Div. One, July 28, 2011)   Fidelity sued Bondwriter for breach of contract and negligence, after Bondwriter delivered unapproved bonds to a contractor. An agency agreement authorized Bondwriter to solicit applications for surety bonds on Fidelity's behalf. The agreement limited Bondwriter's authority to those transactions that Fidelity specifically authorized. In one transaction, Bondwriter mistakenly delivered a bond to a contractor before Fidelity had authorized the bond. When Bondwriter employees realized their mistake, they were unable to retrieve the original bond before the contractor made copies of the bond and…

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In a landmark decision, the California Supreme Court held today that a plaintiff cannot obtain medical expense damages based on his billed medical charges, because the plaintiff was not damaged in that amount.  Howell v. Hamilton Meats & Provisions, Inc. (Cal. Supreme Court, Aug. 18, 2011).  The Court held that the plaintiff could recover only the amount of medical expenses actually paid on her behalf.  The Court said:  We hold no such recovery is allowed, for the simple reason that the injured plaintiff did not suffer any economic loss in that amount."   Plaintiff Rebecca Howell was seriously injured in…

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